Then spree

Website of Nia Davies, poet, editor, writer, performer

Tag: poetry

A word in your shell-like

The second of two blogs on voice, listening, poetry and ‘sinister resonance’ is now live on the Electronic Voice Phenomena website: A word in your shell-like: the listener

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Poems in which – issue 2

is now live. Edited by Nia Davies and Amy Key. With poems from WN Herbert, Sampurna Chattarji, Fran Lock, Kirsten Irving and more. Go to http://poemsinwhich.wordpress.com/ to discover…

The Next Big Thing

I’ve been invited by the poet Amy Key to take part in this blog series where writers answer the same set of questions then pass them on to four other writers. You can read Amy’s interview here and find your way back along the trail of writers.


Where did the idea come from for the book?

Many of the poems in the new pamphlet Then Spree were written without a book in mind, but some of the origins of some of the ideas and impulses include:  things seen from night-bus windows, the glitches, fissures and blooms of language and the world as experienced by a diver. As well as… things my friends say, unusual auditory environments, off-record histories,  folk song and story, watery places and the up hill struggle to learn a foreign language (Turkish!).

What genre does your book fall under?

Poetry

What actors would you choose to play the part of your characters in a movie rendition?

There is perhaps one distinct character (other than myself) in Then Spree – the man (or creature) in ‘Periphylla Periphylla’ who is trapped in a submerged world which is part deep sea, part London street.

I had already written this drunk lonely character’s voyage on the number 38 bus and was half way through writing the second part of his walk through Canonbury when the man himself staggered up to me. On seeing me he stopped, looked me in the eyes, (I was sitting on a garden wall writing by street-light), then he stumbled on. I would like this man to play the Jelly man, but it’s most likely I will never see him again.

What is the one sentence synopsis of your book?

Song’s outer reaches

How long did it take you to write the first draft of the manuscript?

I’ve been writing poetry seriously since I was a teenager and the poems in this pamphlet date back to around five years ago. The manuscript took around 4 months to bring together and edit.

Who or what inspired you to write this book?

I am incredibly lucky in that I have been able to travel and meet people who have opened up the world for me.

The poetry of Lutz Seiler, Sarah Gridley, DA Powell, Denise Riley and others have been vital to me – especially in the last few years of writing the poems in this pamphlet.

A book of Manley Hopkins poems given to me at secondary school by my teacher Mr Martin seems to have had long-range impact and so have nursery rhymes sung to me in Welsh and English, recordings of Michael Rosen’s poems for children and perhaps most importantly for all my writing – folktales from all over the world, told by my grandmother Liza Watts who is a professional storyteller.

From early on the poet and editor Roddy Lumsden encouraged me, challenged my writing approach and provided me with an ever-evolving and inspirational reading list.

And I recently read this which I love: “It’s necessary to maintain a state of disobedience against . . . everything. One must remain somehow, though how, open to any subject or form in principle, open to the possibility of liking, open to the possibility of using.” Alice Notely in the Poetics of Disobedience.

What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

In Then Spree there are secret staircases, vengeful saviours, a man with a jellyfish heart, nudism, white noise, stray ballerinas, singing bowls and obsolete instruments.

Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

The pamphlet is published by Salt in the Salt Modern Voices series.

You can order a copy of the pamphlet on the Salt website

Have yourself a melancholy Christmas…

Cities with a certain wintry hüzün, poverty-stricken children’s book characters, Roddy Lumsden’s grumpy thesp in Terrific Melancholy and how to survive Christmas by the radiator (books!) – a post from me on the New Welsh Review blog  (originally published in the Western Mail last year) is now available to read online at http://www.newwelshreview.com/article.php?id=416

Merry Christmas, Ernest and Celestine by Gabriel Vincent

Then Spree featured on Peony Moon

Periphylla Periphylla

Periphylla Periphylla

My pamphlet Then Spree has recently been featured on the Peony Moon blog. The feature includes two poems from the pamphlet: Periphylla Periphylla and I Want To Do Everything. Go to the Peony Moon website to read more. (The photo above is of the deep sea Jellyfish Periphylla Periphylla which the poem is named after. Credit: David Wrobel).

Then Spree – out now

My first poetry publication has just been published. Then spree is in the Salt Modern Voices pamphlet series. You can buy a copy through the Salt website.

Then spree - by Nia Davies - cover

Poems in Which

Poems in Which headerThe first issue of Poems in Which is here, featuring poems from Sophie Mayer, Wayne Holloway-Smith, Charlotte Geater, Sarah Crewe and many others including myself with a Poem in Which I am at Stake. Poems in Which is an occasional journal of poetry in which the poems share a title but can travel in any number of directions. The first issue is curated by Amy Key but from issue 2 I will be co-editing the blog with her. Issue 2 is open for submissions.

Binders Full of Women(‘s poems)

Binders Full of Women('s poems)

On the eve of the US election I am extremely proud and excited to be in a binder … in this kind of binder anyway: the Binders Full of Women poetry zine project, edited and glitter-glued by Sarah Crewe and Sophie Mayer. Find out more at: http://bindersfullofwomenspoems.wordpress.com

Three poems in Poetry Northeast

Three poems in Poetry Northeast

I’m pleased to have three poems, Born in a moody basket, His glorious and Ocean Nomad, published in the second issue of Boston-based magazine Poetry Northeast.

The Gun

One of my poems – The Gun – about the pub in London’s Docklands – was published in the Morning Star’s Well Versed column yesterday. You can read the poem here. The pub is said to be one of Horatio Nelson and Emma Hamilton’s secret meeting places and there is a hidden staircase which leads to a mirrored room overlooking the Thames. Apparently one of my ancestors was a landlord in the 19th Century and when I visited with my family last year we were treated to an enthusiastic tour from the manager. I’ve since written a poem about Emma and Horatio themselves which will be published in September in Poetry Northeast.

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The Gun – from their website – where you can find out more about this wonderful pub!